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The Buildings of Sam Houston State University documents the changes of the SHSU campus in Huntsville, Texas from its inception in 1879 through tomorrow. The Brick and Mortarboard presents news and commentary about the buildings, the people, and the history of SHSU. Stay informed and impress your friends.

Sunday, December 5, 2004

Today@Sam: Gintz Demolition Extended, Students Given New Option

Sam Houston State University has extended the demolition schedule for the Gintz Family Apartments by 10 days, with a move-out date of June 10 instead of June 1, and the university will have space available for displaced residents in another campus housing unit.

The move-out date has been postponed from its original date because the university wanted to "be aware of when Huntsville ISD lets out and so that [students] are done with finals to give [them] time to move," according to Heather Thielemann, vice president for enrollment management.

The university has worked to provide assistance to the residents of Gintz who may be having problems finding suitable, affordable living arrangements, and will allow the residents to move to the Colony Apartments, according to university president James F. Gaertner.

However, the move to Colony Apartments will also come with a rent increase of about $100 a month, which is the rate charged to students already living there.

Gaertner said that the university decided the Gintz apartments have safety issues because of their age and that their renovation would not be cost effective. And while the university does have plans to replace Gintz with newer housing, there is nothing definite at this time.

Thielemann also said that modifications, such as child protective barriers on the bottom floors, childproof porches and a play area, would be made to the Colony Apartments to accommodate families with small children, though a start date has not yet been established.

"We are honestly working hard to see that we don't displace people and that we treat people as best we can, so this is about as good as we can come up with right now," Gaertner said. "I think [residents] have been very understanding so far. It's not pleasant to be displaced, but I think they realize that we are trying to help them as best we can."