The Buildings of Sam Houston State University documents the changes of the SHSU campus in Huntsville, Texas from its inception in 1879 through tomorrow. The Brick and Mortarboard presents news and commentary about the buildings, the people, and the history of SHSU. Stay informed and impress your friends.

Wednesday, May 24, 2006

Friday, May 19, 2006

April 2006 Regents Report

Today@Sam reports that the Texas State University System Board of Regents approved the construction of a $30 million Academic Building V and a $2 million expansion to the present Campus Mall that requires removal of the Frels-Wilson complex.

SHSU President James Gaertner told the regents that the new academic building will house the College of Humanities and Social Sciences offices and classrooms in 143,301 square feet of space. Also housed there will be additional faculty offices, the post office, accounts payable, purchasing, the business office and human resources. It is currently planned for the area south of the Smith-Hutson addition and east of the Lee Drain Building.

Gaertner said that the 80,000 square feet expansion of the mall south of the Lowman Student Center "will give our expanding student population a spacious area to gather for relaxing and socializing, and to conduct student activities and events."

Also approved were preliminary plans for a $980,000 recreational area to be known as Bearkat Camp, on 345 acres of land adjacent to the Trinity River that was deeded to SHSU in 2002 by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. The recreational area for students, faculty and staff will include a covered pavilion, campsites, fishing, canoeing, nature trails, and rest rooms.

Sunday, May 7, 2006

The Fastest Growing University in Texas

Last fall in the 35 public Texas colleges and universities, there was an enrollment increase of 2,875 students. At Sam Houston State University alone, the increase was 975 students, or just over a third of the entire state total.

Even with the increase of students, University President James Gaertner notes, “...we are not running out of space on our grand old campus."